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Flag Poles

flag and Nickname

Flag Poles
A flag pole is also referred to as a flagpole, flagstaff, or simply a staff and is defined as a a tall staff or pole on which flags are raised or supported. Flag poles are usually made from made of wood or metal. To raise flags, a cord is used, looping around a pulley at the top of the flagpole with the ends tied at the bottom. Flags are fixed to the lower end of the cord and raised by pulling the cord on the other end. The cord is then tightened and tied to the flagpole at the bottom.

Parts of Flag Poles - Halyard and Finial
The 'External halyard' is the name given to the rope or cord system for raising and lowering flags that are located on outside of flagpoles. The 'internal halyard' is a rope, cord or cable system located on the inside of a flagpole for raising and lowering ensigns. They should be hoisted briskly and lowered cautiously. Flagpoles are often decorated with a 'Finial' such as a decorative ball or eagle and used to decorate the top of  flagpoles.

Flagpole

 
 

Flag Poles

Flagpole

Facts about Flag Poles
Interesting facts and information about Flagpoles:

Facts about Flag Poles
Fact 1: The term "half-staff" means the position of flags when they are one-half the distance between the top and bottom of the flagpole
Fact 2: Flags may be flown from sunrise until sunset. If they are displayed outdoors they should always be flown from a flagpole

Fact 3: Flag Poles must be at least two and one-half times as long as the flags

Fact 4: When flags are flown from adjacent flagpoles, flags of the United States should be hoisted first and lowered last.
Fact 5: All flags should be raised and lowered by hand via the flag pole.
Fact 6: The edge positioned toward the flag pole is the heraldic dexter or right edge.
 

Flag Poles and Flag Sizes
The sizes of flags are determined by the exposed height of the flagpole from which it is flying and ensigns must be in proper proportion to its flagpole. It is therefore extremely important to check flagpoles with the sizes of flags. Flags which fly from angled poles on homes and those which are displayed on standing poles in offices and other indoor displays are usually either 3 feet x 5 feet or 4 feet x 6 feet.

Flag Poles and Flag Sizes Chart
The recommended sizes of flag poles are detailed in the following chart detailing the flagpole height (in feet) and the appropriates size of the flags (in feet):

Height of
Flag Poles
  Sizes
of Flags
20 ................................................. 4 x 6
25 ................................................. 5 x 8
40 .................................................  6 x 10
50 .................................................  8 x 12
60 ................................................. 10 x 15
70 ................................................. 12 x 18
90 ................................................. 15 x 25
125 ................................................. 20 x 30
200 ................................................. 30 x 40
250 ................................................. 40 x 50
 

Flag Poles and Sizes of Flags

Flag Poles and Sizes chart
Interesting facts about Flag Poles
Hoisting flags on flagpoles
Flying US flags from flagpoles
Definition design and description of flagpoles
Interesting facts, info about flagpoles
Flag Poles and Sizes chart
Parts of Flagpoles - Halyard and Finial


Flag Poles and Sizes of Flags

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